ICP GETS POLITICAL WITH NEW EXHIBITIONS

Work from Edmund Clark: The Day the Music Died

Edmund Clark: The Day the Music Died
Then They Came For Me: Incarceration of Japanese Americans during World War II
Both through May 6th, 2018
ICP Museum: 250 Bowery, New York City

The International Center for Photography has two new recently-opened exhibitions on view, both exploring politically relevant subject matter. The first, “Edmund Clark: The Day the Music Died,” presents photographic, video and installation work focusing on the measures the United States deems necessary to protect citizens from the threat of international terrorism (in short, the War on Terror). It also explores the far-reaching effects of such methods of control on issues of security, secrecy, legality, and ethics. Organized by Director of Exhibitions and Collections Erin Barnett, this is Edmund Clark’s first major solo exhibition in the United States.

A 1942 photograph by Clem Albers featured in “Then They Came For Me: Incarceration of Japanese Americans during World War II”

The second, “Then They Came For Me: Incarceration of Japanese Americans during World War II,” examines President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s shocking decision to, in the name of national security, forcibly remove and imprison all people of Japanese ancestry without due process or other constitutional protections to which they were entitled. The exhibit features works by renowned photographers Dorothea Lange, Ansel Adams, and more documenting the eviction of Japanese Americans and permanent Japanese residents from their homes as well as their subsequent lives in incarceration camps. Also featured are photographs by incarcerated photographer Toyo Miyatake.

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